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Fast Forward is a technology news site dedicated to writing interesting news articles about technology, consumer electronics, and the future. Once or twice a week we post articles giving anyone who is interested an insight into the world of technology and the future. Mars colonies, the fourth dimension, wearable tech, future transportation, and smartphones are just a small portion of the topics covered on Fast Forward. Along with that, Fast Forward also occasionally publishes on consumer electronics and online culture.

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AARON MORGAN

Fast Forward was founded and is written by Aaron Morgan. Aaron loves technology and anything to do with the future, and started Fast Forward to give people a glimpse into what might come in the world of tomorrow. Aaron also founded and runs another site, Video Shakedown (videoshakedown.com), which finds and curates the best videos from around the web for your enjoyment.

If you would like to contact Aaron, you can email him at amorgan@fftech.net or DM him on twitter @FFtechdotnet.

 

2 comments

  • Whydoyouneedmyname? (2 years)

    http://fftech.net/totw-cubestormer-iii/ :

    “But somewhere out there, for each 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 possible combinations, there is a way to finish the cube in only 29 moves, since there is 29 squares on a cube.”

    THIS IS NOT TRUE. Where are the 29 squares on a Rubik’s Cube ? Some people are laughing about it (your article) on a Rubik’s Cube forum ! Moreover, we can finish the cube in less than 29 moves (20 or 26 depending of the definition of a move (HTM or QTM) ).

    Thank’s for changing that and sorry for my bad english (this is not my own language) !

    • FFtech (2 years)

      Thanks for pointing this out! You’re right, it’s obviously not true that a Rubik’s Cube has 29 sides. My mistake! How’s this do as a replacement?

      “But somewhere out there, for each 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 possible combinations, there is a way to finish the cube in only 54 moves, as there are 54 colored squares on a cube. 54 isn’t the minimum amount of moves, though, as many algorithms and computer simulations have shown that it’s possible to solve the cube in an optimal range of 20 – 26 moves. In fact, an equation known as God’s Algorithm proved that any cube can be solved in 20 moves or less, henceforth making 20 known as God’s Number.”

      Again, thanks for pointing this out!

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